Color Psychology could be more important than you think!

Every brand’s main goal is to have a unique identity and stay in the customer’s memory for a long time. Every business wants to be the first one a customer thinks about when they buy a product or service.

The process of designing of a brand or logo requires a lot of research and thought. Color, which is one of the most important aspects of a brand, plays a major role in getting brand recognition and identity. People get attracted to visual elements far more than they do for text.

Ever color has unique characteristics and must be chosen carefully to represent the brand. Let’s reflect on the most used social media brands like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. All three of theses brands use blue as their brand color. Have you ever wondered why? Blue is a color that is known to build a sense of trust in the brand. It has characteristics of being sensible and reliable. According to a study, blue is the favourite color of most people.

The psychology of color is a topic studied by many designers and marketers to attract their audience. The color of a brand is capable of changing the customer’s perception of a brand. The infographic below analyses six colors and differentiates them based on their characters. You can also read about how these colors have an impact on marketing and branding. Brands like KFC, Pizza hut, and Coca Cola use red as their brand color. Red color is known to stimulate appetite and attract the attention of customers. Many fast food brands use this color to pull in customers and lure them into purchasing their products.

Marketers need to make sure that their brand, color, fonts, logos are consistent across channels and target the audience they’re most interested in. Color is said to increase brand recognition by 80%. Think about the major brands and analyze why they use a particular color. Understanding color psychology helps in building a brand that last forever in the customer’s mind.

Via Market Inspector

Color Psychology

Color Psychology