By introducing “toilet paper” for phones inside bathrooms at Narita International Airport, Japan has taken its reputation for hygiene to another level. The paper bears the message “Welcome to Japan” and has information about Wi-Fi spots and other travel-related information. The smartphone cleaning paper can be found in a dispenser next to the regular toilet roll, notes The Guardian.

Japan Toilet Paper
Photo by kropekk_pl (Pixabay)

What’s the need for smartphone toilet paper?

Japan has taken the meaning of public convenience very seriously by inviting people to pull off a piece of paper and give their smartphone screen a neat germ-busting shine. The rolls of paper and paper dispensers code-named “toilet paper for smartphones” look like smaller versions of regular toilet paper and dispensers.

The introduction of smartphone sheets came in response to studies which conclude that the screen of our smartphone typically houses more bacteria than toilet seats. Also a survey by a Japan tourism agency shows that foreign visitors have encountered the most problems with Wi-Fi services or a lack of them in the country.

The toilet paper for smartphones brought to Japan by Docomo is a solution to such findings. The toilet paper can be used to clean smartphone screens and learn about the Docomo Wi-Fi services and other important travel information. Docomo has also come up with a video explaining how to use Japan’s toilets and the special rolls of paper.

According to The Mainichi Shimbun, the smartphone sheets were installed in about 86 cubicles at seven restroom facilities in the arrival terminal. The smartphone cleaning sheets and dispensers were installed on December 16, and they are set to remain in place until March 15.

According to The Mainichi, incoming passengers at Narita Airport are motivated to read their smartphone cleaning wipes before they flush them away to get information about Wi-Fi spots and other travel details.

Toilets a serious business in Japan

According to a survey by popular Japanese toilet manufacturer Toto Ltd., in 2015, foreign visitors from all over the world are impressed with the versatility and cleanliness of Japan’s public toilets. Toilets are a serious business in the country. Many public buildings in Japan are fitted with heated seats with hi-tech washlets.

In addition, users of some of the women’s public lavatories can get assistance from the sound princess – a gadget that can cover up any embarrassing sound associated with answering the call of nature, by throwing out loud flushing sounds.

According to the Mainichi Shimbun, the smartphone sheets were installed in about 86 cubicles at seven restroom facilities in the arrival terminal. The smartphone cleaning sheets and dispensers were installed on December 16, and they are set to remain in place until March 15.