The newly-launched Apple Watch Series 2 looks similar to its predecessor. But it has many under the hood improvements, including technology to expel water after a swim. On Tuesday, the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) published a total of 64 patents that it has granted to Apple. The list of granted patents includes the “Liquid expulsion from an orifice” feature that debuted with the Apple Watch Series 2.

Apple Watch Series 2
Image Credit: ToomaCZ/Pixabay

How the water expulsion tech in Apple Watch Series 2 works

The Cupertino company had first filed this patent in May 2014. It describes a method to transport liquid out of an acoustic chamber. The system allows swimmers to eject water trapped in the open speaker port by playing a prerecorded sound. According to Apple Insider, water is forced out of the speaker chamber by outputting sound waves “that propagate through the acoustic channel.”

Image Credit: Apple Inc / USPTO
Image Credit: Apple Inc / USPTO

Another patent titled “Portable electronic device connector” describes a method to expand the utility of Apple Watch through a diagnostics port located under one of the strap lugs. The diagnostics port, which was discovered as early last year, was supposed to support data and power transfer. Apple’s patent filing describes strap-based smart accessories that connect to a Watch through a set of six-pin connectors. This patent was filed in May 2015.

Future Apple Watch models may feature Fast Charging

There are a few other patents as well, including one that could add Fast Charging function to the Digital Crown. It could provide the future generations of Apple Watch with an additional power boost when it’s running low. The patent titled “Connector-free magnetic charger/winder” describes a method to use a magnetic field to drive an element without physically contacting the element being driven.

The Apple Watch Series 2 has been praised by critics, especially for its renewed focus on fitness enthusiasts. Priced at $369, it includes a GPS tracker, a faster processor, and an improved water resistance for swimming. However, it still lacks its own cellular connection.