Twitter has been held responsible for the rise of ISIS in a long-standing lawsuit which resurfaced after plaintiffs filed a revised version of the complaint that had been struck down earlier this month. In the new complaint, the plaintiffs argue that Twitter’s Direct Messages serve as physical communication equipment for ISIS just like a radio or a satellite phone, reports The Verge.

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New complaint could pose danger to Twitter

The plaintiffs also made two previous complaints, but the judge struck down both of them. Each time, the judge granted 20 days to the plaintiffs for filing a new complaint in response to the reasoning for the dismissal. The latest complaint is very similar to the one filed in January, but a few crucial differences between the two will be at the center of the court’s response, the report notes.

David Shields, a military contractor killed in Jordan in an attack linked to ISIS, is at the center of the complaint. Now the family of Damon Creach has joined Shields’ family. Creach was a fellow contractor killed in the same attack, the report notes.

The plaintiffs argue, “Giving ISIS the capability to send and receive direct messages… Is no different than handing it a satellite phone.”

The plaintiffs believe that Twitter should be held responsible for the attack and have given new arguments in support of their claim. When District Judge William Orrick dismissed the case earlier this month, he faulted the plaintiffs for not articulating a case for why providing access to Twitter’s services constituted material aid to ISIS.

The new complaint might address that concern as it includes some language that explicitly compares Twitter with other communication tools, says The Verge.

Paying more to get videos

In other Twitter-related news, YouTube has some amazing people creating videos for them that help it lure huge audiences, and Twitter wants equally-talented creators. For this, it is pulling a page from YouTube’s playbook and plans to sell ads alongside creator videos and share ad revenue with the content makers, says Re/code.

The offer Twitter is making is very appealing. While YouTube gives 55% of the money to creators, Twitter is giving away 70% to the content creator and keeping 30% to itself. The revenue split is the same as what it offers other Amplify video partners such as the NFL, notes Re/code.