Brock Turner aside GWU Has Among Highest Rape Rate in U.S

GW had the twelfth highest number of reported rapes in 2014″ and “the most reported rapes out of the D.C. area colleges,” according to a new study by the University student newspaper, The Hatchet, entitled: “Analysis Places Reported Rapes at GW among Highest in Country.”

In response, a GWU law professor known for his expertise in this area, as well as a proven record in taking legal action to protect women, has proposed that his university try – or at very least consider trying – a remarkable new program which has been proven, to the satisfaction of the nation’s leading medical journal, to be able to slash rapes by almost 50%.

GWU Has Among Highest Rape Rate in U.S

Brock Turner – wake up call

As reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, a highly respected peer-reviewed publication: “In this randomized, controlled trial, the risk of completed rape . . . was significantly lower over a period of 1 year among first-year university women . . .  These results contrast with previous reports of the limited effectiveness of other interventions for women. . . The 1-year risk of completed rape was significantly lower in the resistance group than in the control group.”

Indeed, the percentage of rapes was slashed by almost 50% [5.2% compared to 9.8%]; a remarkable result.

Public interest law professor John Banzhaf noted that there are a wide variety of rape-related programs on campus – including those urging bystander intervention, a red-light green-light game, etc. – but that none have been shown to have any effect on actually reducing the number of rapes.

Noting that “the classic definition of insanity is ‘doing the same thing over and over, and expecting a different result,'” he asks “why doesn’t George Washington University [GWU] do more to prevent rapes before the occur.”

The article in The Hatchet notes that the University did change “its sexual assault policy, distinguishing the discipline protocol for sexual assault offenders from those who committed other prohibited acts of violence,” and that officials created new rules for dealing with sexual assault on campus, and reassessed the responsibilities of the Title IX coordinator.”

But, notes Banzhaf, these new policies and procedures are not even designed to actually prevent rapes, but rather to deal with them only once the tragedies have already occurred.

He therefore argues: “So let’s concentrate on actually reducing rape, and not expend some much of our limited resources on standards or procedures for adjudicating rape complaints, encouraging more reporting (which may have little effect on incidence, and might even be counter productive), and on new but unproven so-called courses and programs.”

Also, Banzhaf’s alternative proposal for the better handling of complaints of campus rapes is reportedly about to be tested in Virginia, and he suggests that GW also consider implementing it.

JOHN F. BANZHAF III, B.S.E.E., J.D., Sc.D.
Professor of Public Interest Law
George Washington University Law School,
FAMRI Dr. William Cahan Distinguished Professor,