A leaked iPhone 7 ‘spy shot’ has been doing rounds on the Internet for the last couple of days, offering a glimpse of Apple’s next-gen smartphone. But the leaked image was that of Meizu Pro 6 rather than the iPhone 7. Meizu’s VP of sales & marketing Li Nan took to Chinese microblogging site Sina Weibo to rubbish those claims. He even published a photo of Pro 6 to prove it.

iPhone 7 'Spy Shot' Is Actually Meizu Pro 6: Meizu VP

Meizu Pro 6 bears uncanny resemblance to iPhone 6S

The source of the spy shot had claimed that it came directly from an employee of Foxconn, which makes iPhones for Apple. The shot carried a dark Apple logo and had an iPhone 6S-like design. It showed the iPhone 7 with a dual-camera module in the upper left. In line with past rumors that Apple would get rid of the ugly antenna bands, it had the antenna bands curling around the top and bottom of the phone. The leaked image also pointed to a Smart Connector.

Nan’s Weibo post includes pictures of the top and bottom half of the upcoming Pro 6, which sports an iPhone 6S-inspired design. The antenna bands can be seen at the top in the first image and bottom in the second one. The executive followed up with a rendering of the Pro 6 front side showing curved edges, beveled bezel, and an iPhone 6S-like design.

iPhone 7 'Spy Shot' Is Actually Meizu Pro 6: Meizu VP

iPhone 7: what to expect

Though the iPhone 7 is still about six months away, design and component leaks and renders of the device are already in full swing.The new iPhone is said to get rid of the 3.5mm headphone jack as Apple moves to Lightning-compatible or wireless headphones to make the device slimmer. The phone will also ditch the protruding camera on the back.

Apple is working to launch a Pro version of iPhone 7 that will reportedly feature dual-lens camera module with technology provided by LinX Imaging. The first wide-angle 12MP lens would be equipped with optical image stabilization, while the second telephoto lens will be capable of magnifying a picture by up to three times. Users can capture images using both lenses, then the Apple software will quickly combine them to produce DSLR-quality photos.