BlackBerry’s latest flagship Android smartphone – the Priv – is seen as the last hope for the Canadian firm’s hardware business. For this, the company is trying every gimmick to make it popular among customers. Now the Canadian company has released a new video that talks about the premium materials, quality and design of the smartphone with the aim of attracting customers back to BlackBerry devices.

Priv’s assembling process in a video

The animated video gives an exploded view of the device as it assembles itself into the sliding keyboard Priv. However, it does not provide viewers with the real guts of the smartphone as it is entirely animated. People unfamiliar with the device should check out reviews to get an idea about it.

Lately, BlackBerry has been forthcoming on its Priv and success in the smartphone market. About a week ago, we got to hear about the device from CEO John Chen, but he did not reveal any official sales figures. And recently, DxOMark, one of the most popular digital photography benchmarking groups, put the Priv device on par with the iPhone 6s with a score of 82. This score is higher than those secured by the Galaxy S5 and Nexus 6 but lower than that of the Galaxy S6 Edge+.

BlackBerry betting on security

The BlackBerry Priv is becoming available in more markets, now landing at the Dubai Mall. Originally, the company planned to roll the device out to UAE stores starting in January. The device went on preorder on Dec. 21. BlackBerry’s store in Dubai said that they have started selling the device a week earlier than expected.

“We started selling it from December 26. We received stocks a bit early and so decided to place them on stands,” the Dubai store said.

BlackBerry is hoping to make a comeback in the smartphone race by promising secure Android devices. The Canadian firm believes that most smartphone users are living in an era of anti-privacy, especially those using Android devices.

Citing a Cambridge University study, the company said 90% of Android devices stand a risk of getting affected with critical vulnerabilities due to slow patching, while 60% of Android devices are prone to WebView security risks. The most alarming news is that 30% of mobile apps steal and sell contacts, messages, photos, or browsing history of users to parties ranging from aggressive advertisers to cybercriminals.