Intel has found a solution to a very common problem faced by every Internet user. No one likes trying to remember their passwords, but they are a necessity. In today’s time, almost every person uses multiple devices and needs to visit several websites. Keeping track of all the passwords is a really tough task. Therefore, Intel has come up with a solution to this problem.
Intel Exec: 'Eliminate All Your Passwords Today'

Intel makes surfing easier for users

Intel has developed a technology to allow people use their fingerprints or their face for logging in instantly. On Tuesday at the Citi Global Technology Conference, Senior VP and General Manager of Intel’s Client Computing Group Kirk Skaugen said, “We want to eliminate all passwords from computing. I can confidently say today, you can eliminate all your passwords today, if you buy a 6th Generation Core system.”

Some of the latest Windows 10 devices are powered with the new 6th Generation Core chips, which Intel released last week. These devices come with Windows Hello, which is the new facial recognition software. Users also need to have Intel’s RealSense 3D camera for enjoying the full functionality of Windows Hello. For determining the identity of the user, the camera looks at multiple angles for detecting the depth and heat of the photo.

Intel is keenly interested in killing the password and has been very vocal about it as well. The chip maker released an app called True Key earlier this year, allowing users to log in to multiple apps using biometric features. Late last year, the chip maker also acquired PasswordBox to help users break free from passwords.

Intel’s tech is very accurate

Talking of the accuracy of the technology, Skaugen shared an incident which he called “one of my funniest demos in my 23 years at Intel.” While giving a demo in Berlin, he brought two identical twins on the stage and mixed them up. Despite this, the PC allowed only one of them to log in, Skaugen said.

Twins have been used several times for validating Intel’s RealSense Camera on Windows Hello. The Australian conducted a similar test recently. It used six sets of identical twins to prove that the camera worked seamlessly. Not a single twin could log in with the help of their sibling’s photo.