Facebook is testing a new feature called “See First” to give preference to posts from user-selected contacts. The social networking company continues to push forward its efforts to make News Feeds better and more interactive by prioritizing the content users want to see first.

Facebook Tests 'See First' Feature To Prioritize Some Posts

Always trying to improve users experience

Facebook told TechCrunch it is testing a new feature that will enable the user to select a specific person or page they would prefer to see posts from on a priority basis. The social network stated that it keeps on exploring new ways to make the Facebook experience even better. However, it is still not clear if Facebook will release the feature for everybody, which will only happen after it has tested it successfully.

Several years ago, Facebook asked users through granular sliders about how much they wanted to see each type of content such as photos or relationship statuses. But since that was far too complicated, Facebook allowed users to select the content types they want to see in their posts. However, this feature was also tiresome as it required the user to manage subscriptions to lots of friends.

Last year, Facebook came up with another News Feed menu that let users quickly unfollow anyone to remove their feed without unfriending. However, it was still not possible to select favorite pages and friends and see more updates from them.

Hopefully this latest feature will offer better control to Facebook users by enabling them to extract the posts from their friends and family instead of searching through enormous feeds from pages, groups and other contacts.

What is Facebook hiding?

Facebook is not just allowing users to manage their content but is also censoring the content on behalf of requests from law enforcement agencies. In its report “Who Has Your Back?,” Electronic Frontier Foundation revealed how tech companies comply with government requests for user information.

In their recent report, they highlight one unusual fact. The social networking site deliberately closed the Facebook pages of hundreds of prisoners, and this it has kept as secret. The report read that Facebook responded to 74 requests for the California Dept. of Corrections and Rehabilitation alone in 2014. It further said that just from California and South Carolina, the social network has processed over 700 take-down requests over the last four years.