Apple launched its first smartwatch just months ago, and new rumors involving the Apple Watch 2 have already surfaced. Korean media source MK News recently claimed that LG will supply the same P-OLED screen for the next wearable.

Apple tapped LG to supply displays for the current watch. The P-OLED is an ideal choice thanks to two key features: low power consumption and flexibility. Although the screen is made of plastic, it is covered in glass or sapphire to prevent physical damage.

Apple Watch 2 Will Release Next Year [RUMOR]

The appeal behind LG displays

According to MK, LG creates quality displays in a timely manner, and that is something Apple appreciates. The last thing the company wants to worry about is supply shortages, and their partnership with LG makes a lot of sense.

Apple’s recent unveiling of Apple Music has a lot of people talking. Although the tech giant hopes to reclaim glory as the main source for new music, many are wondering if Apple is biting off more than it can chew. The new music service offers an on-demand subscription service similar to Spotify, a global online radio station, and a social media service for music fans to keep up with their favorite artists.

The new service won’t change iTunes, which will remain an online destination for digital entertainment and apps. Apple Music will enable fans to access over 30 million songs on demand for a low fee. Music listeners can discover new songs through the subscription service and then purchase their favorites through iTunes. Apple aims to become the all-in-one destination for music.

Apple Music’s naysayer

Apple Music starts June 30. In an effort to win over listeners, Apple will offer a three-month subscription for free. After the free trial is over, users must pay the $9.99 monthly fee or sign up for the family plan for a $14.99 monthly fee. The family subscription plan allows up to six people to share the plan.

Despite the excitement and anticipation for the upcoming service, some critics don’t think it’s going to last. One notable critic, Bob Lefsetz, believes the service is already “toast.”