Sony’s plans for a film version of Dr. Who were leaked out along with other details about what the entertainment giant is planning. Apparently things aren’t going so smoothly with the negotiations among those who will be working on the movie, however, according to emails between Sony executives and the BBC.

Leaked Sony Documents Reveal Plans For 'Dr. Who' Film

Dr. Who movie coming in eight years

Daniel Bates of The Telegraph reports that the writers of the Dr. Who series aren’t in any hurry to make a movie about the character and his adventures. According to emails that were leaked on WikiLeaks, BBC Television Director Danny Cohen said the TV show will be turned into a movie as part of an eight-year plan.

However, the emails describe the series’ team as being “very hot under the collar.” They apparently feel as if management isn’t listening to or accepting their feedback. The team wants to wait for the right time, although Cohen apparently wants to get the movie out while interest in the TV show is still high.

Hackers steal documents from Sony

These details were in an email sent by Sony International Production President Andrea Wong in January 2014 to CEO Michael Lynton.

The emails which revealed the argument over a film version of Dr. Who are part of a cache of documents stolen by hackers last year. The group which claimed responsibility for the hack called itself the Guardians of Peace, although the U.S. government suspected North Korean hackers of carrying out the cyber-attack in retaliation for the Sony movie The Interview, which took jabs at North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un.

WikiLeaks defends itself against Sony

WikiLeaks, which is known for posting classified government and corporation documents online, released Sony’s confidential documents. The Japanese company’s executives blasted the website, which released and indexed more than 30,000 documents and 73,000 emails which came from over 2,200 different addresses. The website set up a searchable database of everything it collected after the Sony hack.

Julian Assange, WikiLeaks’ editor-in-chief, defended the actions of the organization, saying the public should have access to them because they show how a major influential corporation works internally. Assange also said the documents are “at the center of a geopolitical conflict.”

This isn’t the first time documents from the Sony hack were made public, and it probably won’t be the last. The entertainment company threatened Twitter with legal action after users of the platform posted some of its confidential documents on it. There’s no word yet on whether Sony will threaten WikiLeaks in the same manner for its release of more documents.

As of this writing, shares of Sony were down 4.09% to $29.81 per share at the New York Stock Exchange.