Twitter has seen a major management shift in the past few years, and the recent exit of the developer relation chief suggests the process is still not over

Twitter will see the exit of one more high-profile executive. Jeff Sandquist, head of developer relations initiatives, will leave the company and relocate to the Seattle area. The news of his departure was first reported by Re/code and was later confirmed by a tweet from Sandquist.Twitter Inc Developer Relations Head Jeff Sandquist Leaving

Sandquist’s role at Twitter

Before Twitter, Sandquist worked with Microsoft as a developer. The executive confirmed his departure with a tweet, conveying that he had a wonderful time at Twitter and he had to move out of the company due to a family decision.

During his time at Twitter, he formed the developer relations team and launched several new products such as the Fabric mobile developer tools. Sandquist did not disclose  his next role after Twitter, but he intends to be “quite active” in the Seattle-area tech community.

Twitter has made significant moves in developer and platforms relations over the past year, entering into deals with companies to launch its software kit, Fabric, for third-party developers at its first Mobile Developer Conference in October. With the help of the software, developers of third-party apps find it easier to use Twitter services like Crashlytics and MoPub.

Is Twitter still restructuring management?

Over the past couple of years, top ranked executives at Twitter have been leaving for one or the other reason. In the past, some of the topmost executives such as COO, CFO and head of product exited the company, and even though Sandquist’s departure cannot be seen on the same level, there are indications that the company is still going through the management shifting process.

Sandquist’s LinkedIn page had a mention of Fabric as an area of focus for his team. Additionally, he listed the “syndication products,” which is an important part for Twitter, as a team responsibility. The micro-blogging site is trying to use the syndication number to reveal the number of people seeing tweets without actually logging into an account, says Re/code.

For many years now, Twitter has made efforts to establish that it is much bigger than what its monthly active user number show. The micro-blogging site is now using syndicated tweet views as a metric to prove its point.