Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is building a 3D camera system to replace passwords with facial recognition. Earlier the company came up with a unique wireless cable computer system with a Skylake processor inside, and now the chip maker is showcasing newer technologies such as its face recognition 3D camera system.

Intel Corporation Aspires To Be Number One In 3D Camera Business

Intel working on biometric access

According to the Wall Street Journal, Intel’s Yap Concept, i.e. you are the password, is made to identify the user’s voice, face, or fingerprint to enable biometric access to the device. Kirk Skaugen, who heads Intel’s PC chip business, believes that this technology could be integrated into computers in the near future.

The latest camera technology includes facial recognition capability, and will also create 3D models which can be integrated into other models of computer control. Skaugen said that, for example, the cameras could track a user’s facial expressions and map them to an animated avatar. Intel is excited about its camera technology, which is equipped to scan and create 3D models along with creating a new 3D camera business.

“We are planning to be the number-one 3-D camera manufacturer,” Skaugen told in an event held in Souther California, on Tuesday.

Yesterday, there were rumors citing Asian supplier that Apple’s next iPhone could have a glasses-free 3D display, which is similar to 3D camera technology.

Technology to make life easier for users

During the event held in Southern California, Skaugen demonstrated the development in the company’s three significant units; wireless PC, making passwords obsolete and ;aunching a new kind of user interface. For instance, Skaugen demonstrated how new radio-based technologies allow you to set a laptop on a table and immediately view the computer’s screen on a nearby desktop device without the need to plug anything in.

Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) also wants its laptop customers to enjoy a wire-free power supply. The company is working on technology that can be attached to the underside of the table and send the charging signal through two-inches of wood. The technology does not strictly fall into the wireless charging technology, according to Skaugen, but it can charge a number of devices at once.

Intel also acknowledged that the 2-in-1 concept known as Ultrabooks has faded from customer products, but  can still be used by commercial customers.