Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) tried hard to appease enterprise users as it unveiled the technical preview of its Windows 10 OS. The company has released Windows 10 technical preview to users on October 1 under its Windows Insider Program. The preview clearly suggests that Windows 10 will be a blend of old and new when it is formally released in 2015.

Windows 10 Is What Windows 8 Should Have Been: Analysts

Can Microsoft convince users to upgrade to Windows 10?

Microsoft is looking to establish a strong foothold in the mobile market. That’s why the company released Windows 8 with massive UI overhaul. It works well on touch-friendly devices, Windows 8 alienated a lot of enterprise users who rely on keyboard and mouse. The transition from Windows 7 to Windows 8 was drastic. Its controls were not good fit for desktop users. Analysts believe a more gradual transition was needed to persuade users to upgrade.

Windows 10 takes us back rather than moving forward. But that appears to be a good move. It offers users the familiarity of Windows 7, while adding some of the benefits of Windows 8. This is exactly what Windows 8 should have been, says Kantar Worldpanel tech analyst Carolina Milanesi. This time Microsoft seems to be doing the right thing. The Redmond-based company said it is giving users a sneak peek into the next Windows unusually early in its development cycle so that enterprise users could provide meaningful input.

Windows 10 brings back several controls of older Windows that users are familiar with. For instance, the new OS will have Start menu, but the start button will also provide you quick access to tiles that resemble the one in Windows 8. Microsoft executive Terry Myerson stressed that using Windows 10 won’t be a challenge for consumers or businesses that have been using older versions.

Windows 10 should have come after Windows 7

Enderle Group analyst Rob Enderle said that the software giant “desperately needed to bridge the user experience gap. Enderle too opines that Microsoft should have done all these with Windows 8. Moreover, Windows 10 has been designed to work on all form factors. That means it will replace Microsoft’s OS for smartphones and tablets.

Adam Turner says Microsoft should have made Windows 10 available (or the features of Windows 10) before the company forced Windows 8 on consumers.