Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is prepping for its foray into the smartphone industry. The high-end device will be sold at luxury department store Barney’s and it will be a stylish product geared towards women. The bracelet will probably debut during Intel’s yearly developer conference and Fashion Week.

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Intel

Intel’s stylish luxury smart bracelet

The bracelet is said to feature a curved glass display. Although most details regarding the gadget are still unknown, it is reported this watch will deliver notifications including social media alerts and text messages. Images of the bracelet have yet to surface on the internet, but given the fact it will be a fashion accessory for women, it will likely be significantly lighter in design compared to most smartwatches.

The chip maker is also said to launch an Opening Ceremony which will debut a luxury wearable item at Barneys New York. The retailer’s COO Daniella Vitale believes one of the greatest opportunities is to design a gorgeous accessory. She added that it is exciting to bring smart fashion accessories to life.

Unlike most smartwatches, this accessory won’t be a fitness-related device. It will be a be a luxury device targeting a more specific high-end market. Intel has yet to comment on the matter.

Tech meets fashion

Fashion companies are already working on similar projects. Ralph Lauren introduced the Polo Tech shirt during US Open. The shirt was designed with sensors knitted into the fabric that tracks movement and gauges performance. Although the fashion house did not mention the price of the shirt, the garment will be available for purchase sometime next year. Google also introduced a more fashionable version of Google Glass earlier this summer. The tech giant collaborated with renowned fashion designer Diane von Furtstenberg to create the wears which start at $1,500.

If one thing is evident, it is the fact technology is taking the next big step by merging with fashion.

via: CNET