Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) (NASDAQ:GOOGL) may soon launch a suite of services geared towards the under-13 set. Right now most of the search giant’s services are available exclusively to teens and adults in accordance to U.S. privacy laws.

google for kids

Google may soon launch apps for children

Google’s new service would allow parents to control their children’s internet activities on the website as well as how much information the site collects from their child. Google will still work according with COPPA (Child Online Privacy Protection Act) laws.

One reason Google may want to break into the child-friendly market is because it may want to enter the more lucrative education market. Although the company did launch cheap Chromebooks as a way to appeal to schools and teachers, the computers are limited to Google’s services. A suite of child-friendly apps would be ideal for elementary schools and preschools. It would also make Google a viable competitor against Apple, which made the education-friendly iPad.

Privacy advocate balk at Google’s attempt to launch kid-friendly apps

Not everyone is thrilled with the prospect of Google reaching the young set. Some privacy advocates, like Jeff Chester from Digital Democracy, believe the new services could threaten children’s privacy. He subsequently took his organizations concerns to the Federal Trade Commission.

Google already has a plethora of kid-friendly applications and games on Google Play, but none of these apps were designed by the company. Many of these apps are educational, and many others are of pure entertainment, but a vast number of these apps are both educational and entertaining. Notable apps for kids include SuperWhy! From PBS Kids, Starfalls ABCs, and Frozen Free Fall.

If this report is true and Google starts to venture into kid-friendly apps, it is evident Google has a strong interest in the education market. As technology continually changes education and how schools teach kids, companies will only invest more time and money into revitalizing the industry.

via: FT