Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) has rolled out a walking, talking robot made from 3D-printed parts that will ship towards the end of this year, and the kit would cost around $1,600. The CEO of Intel, Brian Krzanich, was standing with the robot ‘Jimmy’ on the stage at the Code conference in Ranchos Palos Verdes California earlier this week. Jimmy the robot stood on the stage, introduced itself and then waved hands.

Intel

Jimmy can sing and send tweets

According to the chipmaker, ‘Jimmy’ is a research robot, but the company is working on 3D printable parts of the robot, which would be available without charge for a slightly less advanced version. Parts like motors and an Intel Edison processor, which cannot be 3D-printed, will be sold by the partners.

Jimmy can perform a range of functions like sing, translate languages, send tweets and serve a cold beer. Krzanich said that Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is looking to make a move into emerging technologies like smart clothing, after lagging behind considerably in the mobile revolution and making little progress with smartphones and tablets.

Owners can program their robot to perform custom tasks, as well as share these programs with other users in the form of downloadable apps. The Santa Clara, California-based company is expecting that the robot kit will be priced below $1,000 within five years.

Other products from Intel

Intel also showed off the smart onesie, a smartwatch, and a charging ball among other devices at the recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES). These devices are useful from a prototype and reference design point of view, but as consumer products, these upcoming gadgets will have to be fully fleshed out.

Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC)’s $1,600 robot will be sold in conjunction with a book — which means, cynically, that you’ll probably never hear of it again,” says a report from PC World. Intel has not launched many devices for the consumer market. Intel tried to step in the consumer market with it’s over the top streaming TV service known as OnCue, which faile, and was sold to Verizon in January.

Separately, Bill Gross, an entrepreneur, revealed plans for a 3D printer that would be priced for $149, less than the device that is presently priced at $1,000.