“If you don’t like it, sue it,” is a mantra that would fit the United States well, but apparently the States are not alone in this belief. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) has chosen to file a lawsuit for a seemingly very small amount of money if the company truly believes that the Electronic Times reporting is inaccurate and will actually negatively impact sales of Samsung’s newest flagship phone.

Samsung

Really a lawsuit, Samsung?

It seems this suit is almost tantamount to Tesla Motors Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) suing someone for posting a video of a battery fire. Did it happen? Yes. Were they happy? No. If the review by the Electronic Times is not blatantly false, surely the suit will be thrown out of court. Reviewers certainly are welcome to share their opinions, in fact, it is there job.

iPhone criticism

While Apple has zero compunction regarding patent lawsuits against Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930), the company has shied away from suing those that have written unfavorably about the iPhone, even when their reviews were full of flat-out lies.

In 2007, Nomura analyst Richard Windsor stated that the original iPhone had issues with its screen due to a “a chemical deposition to provide touch sensitivity based on heat,” and that film on the touchscreen would fail generating a product recall. Never mind the mind the fact that there was no film and that the touch screen was not heat-based.

A few years later, Rob Enderle used his Enderle Group to suggest that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s “Slide to Unlock” feature would lead to women getting raped as it took too long for them to dial the police(?).

Following that drivel, Windsor was at it again when he claimed that the second iteration of Apple’s iPhone (iPhone 3G) would need a product recall owing to faulty Infineon baseband chips. That of course never happened.

The point is, the iPhone’s sales were never affected by these and scores of other false reports, so perhaps Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) should understand this and learn from Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL). Problem is, Apple would probably sue them for imitating its business practices.