The boycott

Earlier this week, dating site OkCupid called for a boycott of Mozilla and its Firefox browser and then upped the ante by refusing access to its site for those using Firefox. We wrote earlier this week about the story in its entirety. Now, however, that is old news. The move by OkCupid shed more light on the donation and the personal beliefs of its short-lived CEO forcing Eich to step down today.

OkCupid Mozilla

A statement from an OKCupid spokesman said that the dating site firm is “pleased that OkCupid’s boycott has brought tremendous awareness to the critical matter of equal rights for all individuals and partnerships; today’s decision reaffirms Mozilla’s commitment to that cause.”

Mozilla statement

“We know why people are hurt and angry, and they are right: it’s because we haven’t stayed true to ourselves,” said Mozilla executive chairwoman Mitchell Baker in a statement apologizing for the company’s failure to react to the brewing controversy.

While Eich did his best in a blog post last week to separate his beliefs from that of the company’s, the damage was already done when he wrote on March 26th, 2014, “I am committed to ensuring that Mozilla is, and will remain, a place that includes and supports everyone, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, age, race, ethnicity, economic status, or religion.”

Mozilla stated today that it will have more news on its future next week, and that it will also be appointing a new CEO in the middle of next week.

“We will emerge from this with a renewed understanding and humility — our large, global, and diverse community is what makes Mozilla special, and what will help us fulfill our mission,” says Baker.

Following Eich’s resignation, which OkCupid did not call for, the company said today, “We are satisfied that Mozilla will be taking a number of further affirmative steps to support the equality of all relationships.”

If only people accessed OkCupid with a Chick-fil-A browser.