Samsung has already made some bold predictions about what it expects to do in the smartphone market this year. The Korean manufacturer predicted that it expects to overtake Apple as the world’s most popular smartphone during the next twelve months, and its recent release of the Galaxy S5 is presumably the smartphone intended to achieve this exalted goal.

Samsung Galaxy S5

It was first rumored, and now strongly believed by most of the analyst community, that Apple will move the release date of its next generation iPhone forward in order to head off the threat posed by Samsung. But for now the main competitor to the Galaxy S5 is the existing flagship Apple handset, the iPhone 5S. Thus, with the Galaxy S5 now in the public domain, the New York Times took the opportunity to compare the Samsung device with Apple’s handset over the last couple of days, and the results might surprise a few people.

iPhone 5S

While the infamous publication considered that the Galaxy S5 has kept Samsung “ahead of every other Android phone maker”, the New York Times columnist Farhad Manjoo concluded that Samsung still has some way to go to catch up with the Apple iPhone 5S. This doesn’t exactly bode all that well for Apple in and of itself, but it is also perhaps worth bearing in mind that the iPhone 5S is six months old and Apple is apparently planning a radical overhaul of its flagship mobile when the iPhone 6 is released.

Galaxy S5 fails to unseat iPhone

Not only does the Galaxy S5 not match up to the world’s most famous smartphone, but Manjoo suggests that it doesn’t compare to the Apple device in any department. Whether you’re comparing the iPhone with the Galaxy S5 on “speed to design to ease of use to the quality of its apps”, Manjoo concluded that the Apple handset was superior to the Galaxy S5, and that sometimes the gap was quite considerable.

That said, the New York Times columnist didn’t completely write off the Galaxy S5, aside from praising it as the pinnacle of Android devices. The Samsung handset still boats a few advantages over the Apple smartphone, and most of these are viable practical differences which will attract consumers. The longer battery life, water-resistance and the larger display of the Galaxy S5 all drew praise from Manjoo, and none of these can be viewed as entirely trivial.

Certainly screen size and battery life can both be considered significant influences on whether or not a particular smartphone finds favor with the public. But Apple has already moved to address the former of these concerns with the iPhone 6, which will come in a premium model which will apparently feature a 5.5-inch screen; larger than that of the Galaxy S5.

iPhone 6

Will iPhone 6 widen gap?

While this is only one person’s opinion, it will be a pretty big boost to Apple, coming as it does in one of the most high profile publications in the world. The New York Times still carries a great deal of clout, and if it considers the iPhone 5S to be superior to the Galaxy S5, then one wonders what we’ll make of the premium iPhone 6, which looks to be a big evolution from previous iPhones.