Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s iWatch is getting popular among teens even before any official word from the company on the gadget. Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster released a report claiming that over 17% of U.S. teens are ready to pay $350 for an Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) iWatch. A total of 7,500 teens were polled out of which 6% already wear a smartwatch, 61% have an iPhone and 40% have an iPad.

Apple iwatch

“According to our survey of 7,500 teens across the US,” Munster writes, “about 6% of teens currently own a smartwatch.”

Apple iWatch popular even before launch

Munster surveyed the teens to discover the popularity and demand of the iWatch amongst them and the results were interesting, as most of them are looking forward to owning one. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s iWatch is apparently under production and lot has been written on the specifications and look of the gadget, but nothing has been confirmed officially.

He added that the number is a bit higher than what was expected, as there are not many sellers of smart watches in the market. The analyst stated that around 17% of the teens are interested in buying iWatch if Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) launches it at a price point of $350.

The number is remarkable because teenagers the group that’s least interested in wearing a watch. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) is expected to sell approximately 5 million to 10 million iWatches in the first full year of sales.

U.S. teenagers are richer

The survey showed that around 61% of the teens have an iPhone, an increase from 55% in the short span of three months. As many as 67% of teenagers want to have an iPhone as their next smartphone. Android phones were at number 2 with 24% of those surveyed looking to have one. Then there are 60% of the students, who own a tablet and 66% of those tablets are iPads, a decline of 2% from last fall. Around 18% of the students are planning to buy a tablet and 66% of them want an iPad.

Although the numbers are exciting for Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and other onlookers, the survey needs to be seen in a greater socioeconomic context. It should be noted that compared to teenagers all over the globe, teenagers in the United States are richer. Around 7,500 teenagers from America were polled and most of them were from upper middle class families, claims a report from TechFortune. Students living in the inner-city are not the ones who go to the schools where Gene Munster took his samples from. However, it’s hard to deny that teenagers are interested in carrying an Apple product.