Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) published a press release today, March 31st, announcing that it has officially accepted The Carlyle Group LP (NASDAQ:CG)’s $4.15 billion offer for its Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics division. The Carlyle Group made a binding offer to Johnson & Johnson back on January 16th.

Johnson & Johnson

The final vote to accept the offer comes after considerable consultation with a number of works councils and trade unions, New Jersey-based Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said in its statement. The profitable Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics unit had $1.89 billion in total sales in 2013, representing around 2.6% of J&J’s revenue.

In relation to the decision to divest a significant and historical part of the company, Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said earlier that it wants to be the first or second largest player in sectors where it competes or own businesses that are complementary to other Johnson & Johnson divisions.

Earlier statement from The Carlyle Group

“We have been focused on the diagnostics industry for many years given its attractive growth prospects, driven by the crucial role it plays in health care decision-making and influencing patient outcomes,” elaborated The Carlyle Group LP (NASDAQ:CG) managing director Stephen H. Wise back in mid-January. We believe that OCD, with its world class employee base and talented management team, is poised for the next level of success.”

Johnson & Johnson’s Ortho Clinical Diagnostics Background

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics, based in Raritan, N.J., has over 4,500 global employees. The unit’s product line includes blood screening and blood typing tests, as well as other diagnostic and monitoring tests for a variety of conditions. Recently released products include an easy-to-use Vitamin D measurement test, prostate cancer detection and monitoring tests and a new syphilis screening.

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) established the Ortho Products division in 1937. Sixty years later it renamed the unit Ortho Clinical Diagnostics as Johnson & Johnson merged its Ortho Diagnostic Systems and Johnson & Johnson Clinical Diagnostics (bought from Eastman Kodak in 1994) to create OCD.