Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) will soon be rolling out its new design for the News Feed announced last year. After the revamped design is released, mobile and desktop will look same, ensuring consistent and easier usage across platforms.

facebook news feed

Changes made are based on feedback

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) stated in its blog that users have given their feedback on the new design after using the experimental design launched last year. Users, after spending some time on the experimental design, were impressed by the new look, which had bigger photos and fonts along with an easier layout and navigation.

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) has made the changes primarily in the visual realm, which means the change won’t be affecting the ranking of stories in News Feed or how the social site delivers content to people. In the new version of the news feed, the images will be larger in size, and the organic stories and ads will be of the same size, similar to the way they appear on mobile, according to the blog.

Some of the changes made include new font for the text, a newer card arrangement, better presentation for images and the left-hand column will be lighter and more simplified, making the revamped version of the desktop look similar to the mobile one.

New designs not to affect the advertisers

The new design will not affect the advertisers, and the blog said “As a marketer on Facebook, you don’t need to take any action.” The blog also stated that requirements for creative specs and image ratio for ads will remain unchanged.

“Also, this update does not affect how you buy and optimize ads. You should continue to advertise based on your objectives.”

Overall, with all the changes it can be said that the news feed equals the old feed with bigger photos and different font. Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) will launch its news feed design in the coming weeks.

Facebook may get ban in Turkey

In separate news, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan has threatened to ban Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) and YouTube to restrict political competitors against posting an audio recording revealing corruption and other misconduct.

Recently an audio file was uploaded on YouTube where Erdogan was reportedly rebuking a newspaper owner over the phone in relation to an article, and was asking for the dismissal of the particular journalists.

Erdogan has been denying the charges of corruption against him, and is blaming the U.S.-based Turkish Muslim preacher Fethullah Gulen, a former friend, for the wiretraps, which the minister feels are fabricated.