Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) would become the first U.S. private company to employ a full-time beat cop. On Wednesday, the Menlo Park City Council gave a go-ahead to the social networker’s offer to pay $200,000 a year for three years to employ a “community safety police officer,” according to NBC Bay Area.

facebook

Jim Bueermann, president of the Police Foundation told NBC Bay Area, “It’s safe to say this is unprecedented,” and added “But this may be the model of the future.”

Officer not to guard Facebook’s campus

Apart from the hefty amount paid by Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) another interesting fact is the officer will not be safeguarding or patrolling the Facebook campus, but will be responsible for the general safety of schools, businesses etc in the Menlo Park’s Belle Haven neighborhood, where the company’s campus is located. For the safety of its own campus, Facebook already uses a private security force.

According to the New York Times, Belle Haven neighborhood “has been shut out of Silicon Valley’s historic accumulation of wealth.”

Menlo Park City Council unanimously approved the offer from Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) as a tweet from the council read “#CityCouncil unanimously approves agmt [email protected] to hire community police officer to support students, schools, businesses in #MenloPark.”

Responsibilities of the beat cop

Menlo Park Police Commander Dave Bertini told NBC Bay Area that the officer will be a regular “beat cop with a special assignment,” and Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) will have no say over the hiring and conduct of the officer.

Overall, this particular beat cop would draw an annual salary of $108,000 plus perks. The main responsibilities of the officer would be to help schools and large businesses to device effective security measures. The beat cop would also keep an open eye on gangs, taggers and drug dealers along with carrying out fire and earthquake drills for schools and surrounding businesses.

Like always, some have raised concerns over the presence of a corporate “Facebook Cop,” while some regard the move as a step towards social responsibility.

“I’m not sure what’s motivating Facebook,” Bueermann said. “But Mark Zuckerberg has been part of this philanthropic movement. I applaud them for their social consciousness.”