Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT)’s chief of hardware development, Julie Larson-Green, said in an internal memo (reviewed by The Wall Street Journal) that she is moving to a new role. Larson-Green will now head the My Life & Work team, which is a part of Microsoft’s Applications and Services division. She will also be serving as the Chief Experience Officer (CXO), a new position created for her. Larson-Green’s responsibility as the CXO will be to make the company’s online services such as Outlook, MSN, OneDrive and Bing look good and work well on various devices. 

Microsoft Elop

Stephen Elop: the new leader of Microsoft’s hardware business

The 20-year Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) veteran has earlier been responsible for the look and feel of the Windows and Office products. Before being appointed as the chief of hardware development in July 2013, Larson-Green was asked to lead the Windows software and hardware engineering after the sudden departure of Windows President Steven Sinofsky in late 2012. She has also led the program management for the Windows client.

About two months after Larson-Green, Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) announced the acquisition of the mobile unit of Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) (BIT:NOK1V) (HEL:NOK1V) for $7.2 billion. The software giant said that Nokia’s then-CEO Stephen Elop will be leading the expanded hardware business after the companies close the deal. Microsoft expects to close the acquisition in the next few weeks. However, Larson-Green will continue to lead the Devices & Studios Group until the deal is closed.

A big challenge before Microsoft’s new CEO

People close to Larson-Green told The Wall Street Journal that she was actually disappointed with the change in her position. It’s just the beginning of the challenge before Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT)’s new chief executive Satya Nadella. There will be a number of small and large changes in the company after the absorption of Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) (BIT:NOK1V) (HEL:NOK1V)’s device business along with its 32,000 employees worldwide.

Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) shares fell 0.76% on Monday to close at $37.69.