One German-based patent firm is suing Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) for $2 billion in a new lawsuit. IPCom GmbH claims Apple isn’t using patented technology to make 911 calls on mobile phones properly.

Apple lawsuit

The latest patent lawsuit

Back in 2007, IPCom purchased a patent with similar technologies. This was the same year Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) introduced the iPhone. The patent troll also hit Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) (BIT:NOK1V) (HEL:NOK1V) with a lawsuit. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and their competitors have tried to urge the European Patent Office to declare the patent as invalid, however their attempts failed. IPCom basically owns patents yet never uses them. When another company uses the patents for innovative technology, IPCom sues.

Another recent lawsuit against Apple

Earlier this month, Wisconsim Alumni Research Foundation sued Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) for a patent involving the A7 chip. Patently Apple explained, “The patent-in-suit is United States Patent No. 5,781,752 (the “‘752 patent”), entitled “Table Based Data Speculation Circuit for Parallel Processing Computer” was granted to inventors Andreas Moshovos, Scott Breach, Terani Vijaykumar, and Gurindar Sohi. The inventors are leading researchers in the field of computer microprocessor architecture. Their work at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, particularly the work for which they were awarded the patent-in-suit, has significantly improved the efficiency and performance of contemporary computer processors.

This work has been recognized as a major milestone in the field of computer microprocessor architecture/design. Indeed, Dr. Sohi, the leader of the lab that developed the ‘752 patent, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering based on his work in the field of computer architecture. And in 2011 he received the computer architecture community’s most prestigious award, the Eckert-Mauchly Award, also based on his work, including specifically the work in the ‘752 patent. Another inventor, Dr. Moshovos, received the prestigious Maurice Wilkes award from the Association for Computing Machinery, for outstanding contribution to computer architecture by an individual in the profession 20 years or less, for his work in the ‘752 patent.”