Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) racks up another win in its continuing legal battles. The iPhone maker just won the dismissal of lawsuit against Siri, a popular voice assistant feature.

Siri patent lawsuit dropped

United States District Judge Claudia Wilken from Oakland, California dropped claims from four Apple customers who complained that Siri was mis-advertised. The customers stated Siri didn’t answer their questions or properly locate the places they inquired. Wilken pointed out the users didn’t identify specific statements regarding the matter. She explained, “Apple made no promise that Siri would operate without fail. A reasonable consumer would understand that commercials depicting the products they are intended to promote would be unlikely to depict failed attempts.”

Apple

Wilken also dismissed the case as prejudice and consequently the plaintiffs cannot file the complaint again.

Apple prepares for big lawsuit

This win is good for Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), but what’s even more important is they can now place their focus on the upcoming battle with Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930).

Chris Smith for BGR added, “But the outcome of the second trial may be even more important than the first one, as newer devices are included in the lawsuit, and the judge’s findings may have repercussions on last-gen smartphones, tablets and laptops in case patent violations are established, even though 2013 and later devices aren’t per se included in the trial. Both companies have included only pre-2012 and 2012 devices in this trial, with each side choosing 10 devices. Apple is targeting the Admire, Galaxy Nexus, Galaxy Note, Galaxy Note 2, Galaxy S2, Galaxy S2, Galaxy S2 Epic 4G Touch, Galaxy S2 Skyrocket, Galaxy S3, Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 and Stratosphere. Samsung has its eyes on the iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPad 2, iPad 3, iPad 4, iPad mini (first-gen), iPod touch (fourth-gen), iPod touch (fifth-gen) and MacBook Pro.”

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) also has five patents the company claims Samsung infringed on. These patents include a “slide to unlock” patent and “Siri-like search patent”. The courtroom saga continues next month.