Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) has rightfully been accused of not putting enough women in positions of authority. This understanding even dogged its initial public offering when CEO Dick Costolo seemingly made light of the issue. Twitter has long been considering women (a woman) to join the board. This includes high profile females like former Secretary of State and National Security Adviser for George W., Condoleezza Rice. She, however, was far too busy being both the token black and female member of Augusta National Country Club.

Twitter

Instead, Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) chose to name Marjorie Scardino, CEO of publishing and education outfit Pearson, to its board in addition to its auditing committee. This, however, is viewed by many as too little and far too late. Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) underwent a program of diversifying its board over the last year and apparently forgot that an all-male board is, by definition, none too diverse.

Twitter has empowered millions around the world

It’s a bit of a stretch not to find irony in the fact that Twitter has empowered millions around the world, giving them a voice they might not otherwise have, while at the same time sticking to norms of the 19th century.

In Twitter’s defense, they simply represent the realities of Silicon Valley where fewer women are starting companies, are being promoted at companies, are funded, are funders, are on boards, or are being rewarded in the same way in the same way as their male colleagues.

Scardino hoping to make a difference

Scardino has long been an outspoken critic of womens’ lack of inclusion at the highest levels of corporate American, even going so far as to blame herself.

Scardino said she hoped that by the time she left Pearson the firm would be “different in terms of how many women there were as chief executives or chairmen or board members.”, according to a report by the UK’s Telegraph “It’s not too different and for that I’m sorry,” she said,

Consequently, many view her board appointment by Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) as a coup of sorts. When you’ve failed for so long, why not try to make up for it with an outspoken critic of your own failures?

There is little question that Scardino is hugely qualified for her new job regardless of Twitter’s previous failures.