Many of the Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) stores from Canada to the Far East will be open “special hours” on November 17-18, with some of the stores closing two to three hours early on Sunday for reasons unknown, according to a report from AppleInsider.

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Different Apple stores, different timings

On Wednesday, many of the Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) stores in Canada, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan and Spain will  close early next weekend. In all possibility,  Apple stores in East Asia will remain closed on Sunday, whereas it differs from Sunday to Monday for Europe.

AppleInsider discovered that an increasing number of Apple stores were advertising the early closing. Apple stores in Japan are now displaying special hours. Earlier, the stores’ hours were from 10 a.m to 9 p.m, but now the stores will be closed at 6 p.m next Sunday.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) stores in Germany are showing more irregularity with 10 of the country’s 12 stores closing on November 18. A store in Dresden will close early on Monday, and remain fully closed on Wednesday. The Oberhausen store will remain open late on Friday and Saturday but will close early Monday through Wednesday.

Reasons still not known

Although the reasons for the variation in store hours is undisclosed, it must be noted that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has two upcoming launch events, Retina iPad mini in November and Mac Pro in December. The iPhone maker seldom launches a product at the start of the week, instead reserves Friday for big events. It may be that the timing is due to regularly scheduled meetings, but the Oberhausen store’s schedule does not fit in at all.

Gary Allen from ifo Apple Store told AppleInsider that he is not fully aware of the about the new dates, but expects this may be due to pre-holiday preparations.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) usually never closes stores for mere preparation talks or general meetings. But recently the company has experienced outrage from employees who are required to stay for meetings after their official working hours. Some  former employees have even sued for not getting overtime despite staying after their official working hours for meetings and for other purposes.