Tesla Motors Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) Elon Musk has an image of calling spade a spade, and he does not shy away from speaking his mind. The prolific CEO called hydrogen fuel cell technology “bullsh*t” and a “marketing think” adding that the technology is more suitable for rockets than automobiles, according to a report from Autoblog.

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Fuel cells nowhere near modern lithium-ion battery pack

Musk called hydrogen cars bullsh*t while making a speech at a Tesla Motors Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) service center in Germany about the supercharger network that is to be fitted in the country by the end of 2014.

“Oh God, fuel cell is so bullsh*t. The only reason they do fuel cells is… it’s like a marketing thing. […] Putting up a huge hydrogen distribution center is also difficult, and hydrogen is quite a dangerous gas.” He added that the technology is apt for upper stage rockets rather than cars.

Musk’s opinion of hydrogen technology may receive some thumbs up, while others may disagree to what he has to say. As of now, electronic vehicles are faring well, and hydrogen fuel cells are still under development—and electric vehicles have been around for almost a century when compared to nascent hydrogen cell technology.

Musk also said that even the best-in-class hydrogen technology will find it difficult to come near the energy density of a modern lithium-ion battery pack like that found in the Tesla Motors Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) Model S.

Still in development phase

While Musk is obviously inclined towards the electric vehicle battery, the fact cannot be denied that hydrogen technology is yet to take off, after years of promises of zero emission from government agencies and automakers.

However, automobile juggernauts like Honda Motor Co Ltd (NYSE:HMC) (TYO:7267), Mercedes Benz and other are not shying away from trying their hand at hydrogen-electric vehicle development.

Honda is successfully using hydrogen with its FCX Clarity, a functioning concept car that has been doing well for few years now and was given on lease to some southern California residents in 2010.

Showing its commitment to fuel technology, in 2011 Mercedes came up with its reformed B-Class subcompacts. However, recently, there have not been any major developments from either of the automakers along with inefficient infrastructure needed, though hydrogen is readily available as a natural resource.