Earlier this year Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) announced that it was restructuring. Now that each of the company’s new department heads are in place, they’re making some additional changes—changes that could leave at least three executives from the company’s Windows division without leadership positions.

Microsoft

Myerson reassigns Windows execs

Ina Fried of All Things D reports that sources have said that Terry Myerson, who heads up the Windows and Windows Phone division, is shuffling executives in the department. The Windows and Windows Phone divisions were recently united under the restructuring plan that was announced earlier this year.

According to the blog’s sources, long-time executives Antoine Leblond and Jon DeVaan do not have leadership positions under Myerson’s rearrangement of the division. Grant George, who headed up Windows testing, is also not on the new arrangement. The sources said in all Myerson will have seven or more direct reports.

Two Windows Phone executives are taking some of the key group leadership positions inside the division. Henry Sanders will head up development in the division, while Joe Belfiore will run the tablet, phone and PC group. Leblond had previously been heading up Windows 8 applications. One of the complaints about the operating system was that some popular apps were missing when it launched last October. Leblond also worked on the Windows 8.1 software update.

DeVaan has been with Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) for 29 years, and he was a vice president of development for Windows. Some critics of the new structure reportedly said Microsoft was putting aside two of the Windows division’s most experienced minds—DeVaan and George—at a time when it needs them the most. At this point it isn’t clear if DeVaan, George and Leblond will take other positions within the company, remain in the Windows division or leave Microsoft altogether.

Other changes at Microsoft

Myerson is also in charge of software for the Xbox and the Xbox Live service. He reportedly selected Xbox executive Marc Whitten to run both of those businesses. He kept Chris Jones overseeing Windows services, according to All Things D’s sources. In all, My