Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) has confirmed a few things about its soon to be launched TV device and much talked about over-the-top (OTT) TV service. Intel reported that the set top box will not have facial recognition technology; however, there were no comments on other details.

intel tv

Intel’s new service- live TV with a rewind

Eric Huggers, head of Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) Media, said to The Wall Street Journal that their TV device would be an “Internet-based service that doesn’t only serve up on-demand programs but overhauls live TV as well.”

Huggers has a team of 350 people working under him, and the service involves a huge back-end server operation. It will record every bit of programming broadcasted whether local, national or international and will be saved in cloud for three days, according to the Journal.

The Intel device will allow users to watch anything on the TV aired over past several days. Additionally, users will be able to start the program without a local DVR. “This is live TV, but you can rewind it,” Huggers said in the interview.

Timing not apt for facial recognition

There was no confirmation from Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) as to when the device and service will be launched. There is also no confirmation about the name.  GigaOM recently found out through trademark filings that the OTT service or set top box from Intel could be named “OnCue”.

Intel has recently been interested in “perceptual computing”, a mix of older and newer interface technologies across various platforms, incorporating facial recognition along with voice and gesture based technology. In pursuit of the same, the chip maker bought gesture recognition developer Omek Interactive.

Other tech giants in TV

Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is not the only tech giant to try its hand in the TV market. Other tech biggies like Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG), Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX), Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT), and Sony Corporation (NYSE:SNE) (TYO:6758) have launched their own services. New players have good technology but are finding it hard to take content from the traditional TV broadcasters who do not want to give away their power.