Everyone wants to know when we will see the iPhone 6 or 5S or whatever it is. Over the weekend there was a report from All Things D that the unveiling event would happen on Sept. 10. Now there’s a second site which also provide that same date. Or rather, a simple one-word answer indicating that All Things D was right.

Iphone 5S

The Loop “confirms” Apple’s iPhone date

Darrell Etherington of TechCrunch points to a one-word confirmation of sorts by Jim Dalrymple of The Loop. He simply quotes from All Things D, saying, “Apple is expected to unveil its next iPhone at a special event on Sept. 10.” On the next line, he just says, “Yep.”

TechCrunch notes that Dalrymple could be “the single-best informed outside source regarding Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s product event plans.” And of course All Things D usually gets things right when it reports information about what’s going on in the tech community.

Apple’s plans usually fall on a Tuesday

Interestingly enough, that Sept. 10 date happens to be a Tuesday, and Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) is known for holding its events on either a Tuesday or a Wednesday. So what does this day have in store for us? Some are holding out hope for a completely revamped iPhone 6, but that doesn’t look likely at this point. Instead, we’re expecting to see your basic, run of the mill update that’s worthier of the iPhone 5S name rather than the milestone iPhone 6 moniker.

Apple may also release a low cost iPhone

We could also see a low cost iPhone, which leaked photos suggest could be called the iPhone 5C. Of course Wall Street has been concerned about falling average selling prices of the iPad thanks to the release of the iPad Mini, and it’s expected that something similar will happen to the iPhone. Average selling prices of the device have already taken a beating in Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s most recently completed quarter as the company boosted sales of older, less expensive models.

Horace Dediu of Asymco speculates that the low cost iPhone could be priced around $450 to $500 unlocked. He uses a comparison of pricing between the iPad 2 and the iPad Mini to determine what the cost for the low cost iPhone might look like.