Koreans prefer the Apple iPhone over the Samsung Galaxy and it’s a bit surprising. Despite the fact that Samsung is from South Korea, the majority of the market’s customers prefer the world’s leading smartphone. These results come from a customer survey which questioned 44,168 people in age ranges from 16 to 64.


Customers report the iPhone has fewer failures. 17 percent of the group reported problems with the iPhone whereas 31 percent of the group reported problems with Samsung Galaxy. One big complaint regarding the  smartphone is battery power, 20 percent report that particular issue. Other common issues with the Galaxy include LCD screen scratches, picture quality and call performance.

Apple’s iPhone Problems

The survey also reports that Apple’s iPhone has problems with both button and touch malfunctions.

Interesting enough, market shares for the iPhone have declined from 23.2 percent (in 2010) to 3.2 percent this year. Despite this, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) is still successful as a foreign manufacturer in South Korea. The other foreign companies including Blackberry, Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) (BIT:NOK1V) (HEL:NOK1V), HTC Corp (TPE:2498) and Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc (NYSE:MMI) all have less than one percent. Two of the country’s manufacturers LG and Pantech own about 15 percent of the market share each. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) takes the lead with over 65 percent of the market share.

Samsung’s global success in the last few years helped pave the way for the company’s success. The company’s global market share is now over 30 percent, which makes it a higher total than Apple’s share. The reason for Samsung’s immense success may have more to do with their array of offerings rather than the quality. Unlike the Apple iPhone, Samsung’s Galaxy has a phone for various budgets. This may all change if Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) releases a smaller budget friendly phone as it’s rumored.

The war between Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) never seems to end. This report is sure to create more problems and stiffen competition between both companies.