The patent wars between Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) have spanned across space and time, but they just can’t seem to settle their problems. Ian Sherr of The Wall Street Journal reports that sources and legal documents indicate that the two companies have been negotiating privately since last summer.

Apple

Apple and Samsung make no progress

One of the documents reviewed by The WSJ indicates that representatives for the two companies met in person in South Korea in December. Then in February, it appeared as if Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) and Samsung had agreed on a settlement, but then the talks broke down.

Sources said talks between the two companies continue, although there are no new signs that they might be close to reaching a settlement.

Samsung wants a cross-licensing deal

Sherr reports that some of the documents indicate that Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (LON:BC94) (KRX:005930) is pushing for a broad deal which spans across multiple patents and may settle all of the patent lawsuits which are still pending between the companies. Sources were unsure whether Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) was interested in striking a deal like it, although Apple has rejected the fees proposed by Samsung for a cross-patent licensing, saying that they are too high.

The patent wars between Samsung and Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) date back at least to 2011, according to The WSJ. That’s when Apple sued Samsung, claiming that the company copied its products. From there, numerous courtroom battles all over the world have ensued, with Apple winning some and Samsung winning others.

Both accuse each other of infringing on patents. Samsung’s accusations usually involve patents which are considered to be vital for building wireless devices. Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s accusations usually focus either on patents for various functional aspects or for the physical designs of its devices.

Apple wins some, Samsung wins some

Last August, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) received a $1 billion judgment in its favor in connection with three patents which focused on the iPhone’s shapes and its icons. Since then the damages have been reduced, however. Last month Samsung convinced the International Trade Commission (ITC) that some older models of the iPhone and iPad should be banned from import. President Obama could still decide to veto that order, although he has less than three weeks left to make that decision.

However, the ruling from the ITC was important because the document provided from the agency indicates that it sides with Samsung. Documents from the ITC’s ruling show that the commission believes the fees Samsung has proposed for a cross-patent licensing deal are reasonable. It also said that one of the reasons it ruled in Samsung’s favor was because Samsung was “negotiating in good faith” in an attempt to end the ongoing patent wars between it and Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL).