Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has become one of the most polarizing companies in existence today. There are those questioning whether the company has lost its innovative edge, and then there are those who just appear to love Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL), no matter what it does.


How Long Should It Take For Apple To Innovate?

At this point we pretty much know which set of customers Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) sets out to please. Of course it is the second set because they are much easier to please. But it’s worth mentioning that it takes years to create the type of life-altering products that the company once did, but it’s been three years since we saw such a product.

There were three years between the introduction of the iPhone and the iPad, although there was a six-year stretch between the iPod and the iPhone. So how long should it take Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) to create life-altering products?

Forbes contributor Mark Rogowsky wants to know where Apple’s “Loon-y” ideas have gone, especially as Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) keeps coming up with crazy contraptions that won’t see the consumer market for years to come. I think Apple’s big problem is its secrecy. If there is any innovating going on over there, we don’t know about it.

Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG), on the other hand, isn’t afraid to work the media magic long before it’s ready to take its innovations into the consumer market. Some of the products it works on won’t even land in the consumer market. This is why there appears to be innovation going on non-stop at the search giant.

Maybe Apple Doesn’t Need To Innovate Any Longer

But then again, perhaps Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) doesn’t need to innovate any more. There are companies that just follow in the footsteps of others and still do well. We expect more of Apple because of what it has given us in the past. And with thefts of Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) products being up 8.8 percent in New York compared to last year, according to AM New York’s Tim Herrera, it looks like the company is enjoying plenty of popularity, even though so many consumers miss the company’s (seemingly) former creativity.