Twitter has beefed up its security in response to a number of high profile attacks the social media giant and its users have suffered. Starting today, Twitter users will have the option of adding a second level of security when logging into their accounts. While Twitter itself hasn’t fallen victim to attacks, numerous people and corporations have had their Twitter accounts hijacked, none of which shed a positive light on Twitter. While not Twitter’s fault, that is the perception with each high profile attack.


“When you sign in to, there’s a second check to make sure it’s really you,” the company said in a blog post announcing the opt-in security feature. In addition to a password, users will have the option of also being required to provide a six-digit code. Given Twitter’s limit of 14o characters, this is a hardy upgrade.

How To Turn On Twitter’s Two Factor Authentication:

Users simply need to go to their Account Settings page and check the box that reads “Require a verification code when I sign in.” While the measure is identical to Facebook’s, users concerned with security should welcome the “plagiarism.” Once that box is checked, Twitter will ask users for a phone number where the company can send a six-digit code to enter when logging into to their accounts.

“With login verification enabled, your existing applications will continue to work without disruption,” Twitter said. “If you need to sign in to your Twitter account on other devices or apps, visit your applications page to generate a temporary password to log in and authorize that application.”

While some might argue that Twitter account hacking is harmless and the end-users responsibility, it’s important to note that when the Associated Press’ Twitter account was hacked and the attacker tweeted that the White House had been bombed, the stock market immediately fell following the bogus news. CBS and McDonalds have also notably had their accounts attacked, although granted with less effect on financial markets.

Benign attack or otherwise, Twitter has rightfully provided users with an opportunity to prevent both today. Perhaps not prevent, but they have certainly added a much needed layer of security.