Another impressive feat for Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL): the Cupertino-based tech company sold out of tickets for the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) within the first two minutes the tickets went on sale. This was significantly faster than last year, when tickets sold out in the first two hours. It probably didn’t help that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) caught developers by surprise in April 2012 when they sold the tickets right after they announced the conference at 5:30 am Pacific Standard Time. Still, last’s year record wasn’t too shabby.

Apple wwdc 2013

Apple’s annual WWDC is the event for iOS developers to come together and learn more about Apple’s upcoming operating system developments. It looks like the company will also launch OS X 19.9 at this year’s event. Unfortunately, it’s highly unlikely that Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) will unveil the highly-anticipated iPhone 5S or the next iPad at the WWDC as the company usually reserves these unveilings for separate conferences.

Tickets for the week-long conference cost about $1,599 per ticket. The conference is actually comprised of separate labs and developers’ sessions that are led by the company’s engineers. One of the most important parts of the entire event is the keynote speech held at the beginning of the conference where Tim Cook will introduce new products or services.

Last year’s WWDC brought us a few new notebook computers, the official price of OS X Mountain Lion, and a sneak peak of iOS 6.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL)’s biggest competitor Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) has a similar annual event called the Google I/O conference, held at the same location as the WWDC.  Tickets for the Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) event this year sold out within an hour.

This year’s Worldwide Developer’s Convention will take place on June 10th to the 14th in San Francisco. Key highlights for this year’s event include technology labs, Apple design awards, and an Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) trivia game. It will be a huge event that’s sure to make headlines long after the conference.

[via: CNET]