Many users wish Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) would add a dislike button on the social network’s website, to be able to show disapproval to an individual or a company instead of writing their negative comments.

Do you know that Facebook has a dislike button? Only one person has it, but it’s not Mark Zuckerberg. Meet Chuck Rossi, the only person with a dislike button on the social networking giant’s website, according to the report from Bloomberg.

Rossi is the release engineer at Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ:FB). He oversees, gathers, and ensures that all the codes written by all the engineers in the company work together as a whole.

Facebook dislike button

He is responsible in making sure that the social network’s website is free of viruses. In addition, he also decides whether a new feature is ready for integration or implementation in any of the Facebook products.

In other words, Rossi is in-charge of “Push” within the company. It means he supervises and inspects manually, if any of the hundreds of code changes added by engineers on, will cause potential problems.

According to Rossi, Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) has a system called “Push Karma” tied up to the profile pages of every engineer in the company. The system allows him to check what codes had been submitted by each engineer. Rossi explained that the system has a ranking system. An engineers’ profile comes with a four star. He said, “Every developer is born with four stars to his name. If we have an issue when we take someone’s code—and it blows us out of the water—then it takes them down half a star, and I write what happened.” In addition to the four stars, the system also has a thumbs-down indicator.

Rossi said, “I am the only guy who has a dislike button on Facebook. A lot of people want [one], but this is the only place you will see it.”

He uses the dislike button to alert an engineer who makes a mistake in writing a code. According to him, engineers, who make mistakes, are prohibited from making changes in the website, until they’ve completed a review and a retraining process.

“People here are pretty freaked-out about losing their stars, but not in a bad way. It’s all done in good fun. If you catch an error before it goes up on the site, and jump in to save the day, you can earn a half-star back,” said Rossi.

When asked about his job, and how he became a release engineer, Rossi said, it was a conscious decision on his part. According to him, the job of a release engineer is like “plumbing.”

He further stated that his job is “not the most glamorous thing in the world, but I realized that if you’re good at it, you could go to any software company in the world, and they would say: When can you start?”

Rossi also worked at VMware, Inc. (NYSE:VMW) and Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) before joining Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB).