Dwight Yoakam has released his new album “3 Pears”, and as many other artists have done, he has teamed up with Apple to make it available on iTunes. The album contains 11 original songs, written, or co-written by Yoakam.

Warner Brother Records was Dwight’s favored recording studio for 16 years, and he began working with them in 1985. He left Warner Brothers in 2001, and recorded with New West, as well as working in the film industry. His latest album is once again under the Warner Brothers label, and promises to do well.

With tracks like Waterfall, Take Hold of My Hand, and title track 3 Pears, the album holds a definite feel. With former hits, including Fast As You, Yoakam has long held fans attention with his brand of country music.

Now, Yoakam has joined hundreds of other artists in finding another way to get his music to his fans, other than CD sales. Apple’s iTunes has become a Mecca for musicians in all genres, as the user base has soared to record numbers of late. This music outlet has been a great way for musicians to allow fans to download their music, and still make a profit from actual sales.

Apple has watched iTunes and its other applications bear fruit in recent years. The stock has soared to all time highs, closing over $700 per share for the first time on Tuesday. This new milestone was greatly boosted by the announcement of iPhone 5 on September 12, and the record 2 million preorder sales in the first 24 hours of availability of the new gadget.

We also reported earlier today, that Apple’s brand value has jumped 44% in just one year. This record jump has pushed the value far above its competitors in the market place, as well as boosting the company’s net worth to $660 billion.

One change that Apple will be making to iTunes in the near future, includes the retirement of Ping, its iTunes social networking app. The app was launched in 2010 as part of iTunes 10, but has failed to take hold of users in the way Apple had hoped. The newest version of iTunes will not include Ping.

Musicians are seeing the intrinsic value of releasing songs on iTunes, as many people own an iPod, iPhone, or iPad tablet, which allows for playing the music without the need for CD players. This simplicity of use is a major selling point for iTunes accounts, and users have been actively downloading and playing music from the site. It will be interesting to watch as the music industry continues its shift from CDs to mobile content. One day, we just may see hard copies of music done away with altogether, with everything being offered in a streaming or downloadable format.