Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has moved quickly to seize Samsung by the jugular following its win last week in the landmark patent infringement case.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) filed today for a preliminary injunction on Samsung’s sale of only eight devices, out of the 28 products that were found guilty of infringement of Apple’s patents. The application will come up for hearing on September 20.

Samsung 8 Products Ban

The eight devices named in the injunction application are the Galaxy S 4G, Galaxy S2 AT&T, Galaxy S2 Skyrocket, Galaxy S2 T-Mobile, Galaxy S2 Epic 4G, Galaxy S Showcase, Droid Charge, and the Galaxy Prevail.

The graphic displayed above shows the product wise violation by kind of patent, and it appears the Galaxy S 4G is the biggest culprit, having infringed all seven categories and types.

However, the battle is far from over as far as Samsung’s Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer, currently the subject of a ban on sales in the U.S., is concerned.

This product was not held to infringe an Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) design patent, and hence Samsung requested a U.S. District Judge yesterday to lift the sales ban, and to grant it damages for being subjected to an improper sales ban.

However, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has opposed Samsung’s move, and instead requested that the ban be extended to a cellular version of the device, saying in its filing that “While the cellular version of the Galaxy Tab 10.1 was not included in the verdict form, it is not colorably different from the products that the jury found to be infringing as to some Apple utility patents, and thus should be covered by an injunction against sales of products that infringe those patents.”

Last Friday a federal jury delivered their verdict in favor of Apple, awarding it damages of $1.05 billion and held Samsung guilty of infringing a number of its patent rights. Apple has moved its application for a preliminary injunction on the ban of infringing Samsung products, and the successful implementation of the ban could result in a large void in the supply of smartphones – something that could benefit struggling smartphone makers, such as RIM and Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK), and also Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT), whose Windows 8 software finds application in Nokia’s Lumia phones.