apple samsung

The fresh new development in the Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) vs. Samsung  battle, is that the UK judge, Colin Briss, who previously said that the Samsung tablet is not as cool as Apple‘s iPad,  has made a ruling that requires Apple’s UK website to post a notice saying that Samsung did not copy iPad design. The notice has to stay there for a period of six months, and should also be published in newspapers and magazines. These measures will be taken to rectify the damage the infringement claims have put on Samsung’s business. Bloomberg has reported this extremely juicy news bit. If this is indeed a real ruling, things could get ugly as no company would like to put the name of its arch nemesis on their website. It is likely that Apple will appeal against this judgement.

UK court has been hard on Apple, as just last month, the same UK judge ruled  in favor of Samsung. This decision allowed the Korean company to sell its tablets in UK market freely. The Apple fans should not get discouraged by these rulings, as the judge in this case described Samsung tablet’s design in blunt and unflattering terms. The exact words of judge Colin Briss were,  “Samsung’s Galaxy Tab tablets do not have the same understated and extreme simplicity which is possessed by the Apple design. They are not as cool.”

Apple gained the upper hand in Apple vs Samsung, when California’s, San Jose court granted temporary injunctions on the sale of Samsung Galaxy tablets and Galaxy Nexus smartphones. Apple and Samsung are the biggest market players in the smartphone industry.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has not been very successful with its previous infringement claims either. The ruling of the California judge marks the only favorable judgment for Apple. The company has previously lost cases against Motorola Solutions Inc. (NYSE:MSI), an acquisiton of Google and HTC, which uses the Android OS in its smartphones. These judgments said that Apple’s case of patent infringements were invalid, and are therefore dismissed. The UK ruling is perhaps the only incident where Apple is being asked to pay a real price for misdirected patent claims. Putting up a notice, is indeed a higher price to pay than banning a product, as it will crush Apple’s ego in the process.