Windows Phone 8

The Nokia World 2012 event will be held in Helsinki, Finland on September 5.

The event is likely to be the springboard for the launch of two new Windows Phone 8 handsets, and also an impressive preview of Windows Phone 8. The event should provide a good view of the consumer-centric features, which are expected to be talking points of the new OS.

The developer-oriented overview of Windows Phone 8 last month, given by Microsoft last month, did not satisfy worldwide curiosity about the consumer side of the equation.

Various names for the  Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) units to be under display are being bandied about, and range from Lumia 910, to 950 and 1001.  But most plausibly, these could be Lumia 910 and Lumia 920 according to this report. The report also says that after the release, Nokia should get about one month as the exclusive global seller of handsets based on Microsoft’s latest Windows Phone 8 OS. The devices are likely to compete with the mid-to-upper range  Android phones, and may incorporate Nokia’s revolutionary PureView imaging technology, which allows for the taking of high resolution pictures through mobile phones.

The new phones are probably a lifeline for beleaguered Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK). But are they likely to be swamped by the fall tsunami of the iPhone 5?

The much talked about iPhone 5 has even pressured the last quarterly result at Apple, because phone buyers held back purchases, preferring instead to wait for the iPhone5. According to some analysts, the launch of the iPhone 5 could be a consumer event of historic proportions, and Apple could end up selling almost 50 million units of this phone immediately after its launch.

The global phone industry will feel the impact of this event, as the tendency to hold back on new phones will be almost all-pervasive before Apple’s launch. Where does this leave Nokia’s new Windows phones? Probably on retailer shelves, and this is borne out by current estimates that Windows Phone 8 market share trails fourth, behind Android, iOS, and Blackberry, and could at most rise in the United States to about 4 percent, and globally to about 5 percent.