The Economic Collapse Blog does a terrific job of periodically putting together a compilation of the scariest data points about the US economy. Today is one such day, and the list of 50 economic numbers presented is indeed, as the author puts it, “almost too crazy to believe“… Almost. As noted: “At this time of the year, a lot of families get together, and in most homes the conversation usually gets around to politics at some point.  Hopefully many of you will use the list below as a tool to help you share the reality of the U.S. economic crisis with your family and friends.  If we all work together, hopefully we can get millions of people to wake up and realize that “business as usual” will result in a national economic apocalypse.” Or, far more likely, 99% of the population can continue watching Dancing with the Stars, as what little wealth remains is terminally transferred to those who are paying attention right below everyone’s eyes.

From the Ecopnomic Collapse Blog:

The following are 50 economic numbers from 2011 that are almost too crazy to believe….

 

#1 A staggering 48 percent of all Americans are either considered to be “low income” or are living in poverty.

 

#2 Approximately 57 percent of all children in the United States are living in homes that are either considered to be “low income” or impoverished.

 

#3 If the number of Americans that “wanted jobs” was the same today as it was back in 2007, the “official” unemployment rate put out by the U.S. government would be up to 11 percent.

 

#4 The average amount of time that a worker stays unemployed in the United States is now over 40 weeks.

 

#5 One recent survey found that 77 percent of all U.S. small businesses do not plan to hire any more workers.

 

#6 There are fewer payroll jobs in the United States today than there were back in 2000 even though we have added 30 million extra people to the population since then.

 

#7 Since December 2007, median household income in the United States has declined by a total of 6.8% once you account for inflation.

 

#8 According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 16.6 million Americans were self-employed back in December 2006.  Today, that number has shrunk to 14.5 million.

 

#9 A Gallup poll from earlier this year found that approximately one out of every fiveAmericans that do have a job consider themselves to be underemployed.

 

#10 According to author Paul Osterman, about 20 percent of all U.S. adults are currently working jobs that pay poverty-level wages.

 

#11 Back in 1980, less than 30% of all jobs in the United States were low income jobs.  Today, more than 40% of all jobs in the United States are low income jobs.

 

#12 Back in 1969, 95 percent of all men between the ages of 25 and 54 had a job.  In July, only 81.2 percent of men in that age group had a job.

 

#13 One recent survey found that one out of every three Americans would not be able to make a mortgage or rent payment next month if they suddenly lost their current job.

 

#14 The Federal Reserve recently announced that the total net worth of U.S. households declined by 4.1 percent in the 3rd quarter of 2011 alone.

 

#15 According to a recent study conducted by the BlackRock Investment Institute, the ratio of household debt to personal income in the United States is now 154 percent.

 

#16 As the economy has slowed down, so has the number of marriages.  According to a Pew Research Center analysis, only 51 percent of all Americans that are at least 18 years old are currently married.  Back in 1960, 72 percent of all U.S. adults were married.

 

#17 The U.S. Postal Service has lost more than 5 billion dollars over the past year.

 

#18 In Stockton, California home prices have declined 64 percent from where they were at when the housing market peaked.

 

#19 Nevada has had the highest foreclosure rate in the nation for 59 months in a row.

 

#20 If you can believe it, the median price of a home in Detroit is now just $6000.

 

#21 According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 18 percent of all homes in the state of Florida are sitting vacant.  That figure is 63 percent larger than it was just ten years ago.

 

#22 New home construction in the United States is on pace to set a brand new all-time record low in 2011.

 

#23 As I have written about previously, 19 percent of all American men between the ages of 25 and 34 are now living with their parents.

 

#24 Electricity bills in the United States have risen faster than the overall rate of inflation for five years in a row.

 

#25 According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, health care costs accounted for just 9.5% of all personal consumption back in 1980.  Today they account for approximately 16.3%.

 

#26 One study found that approximately 41 percent of all working age Americans either have medical bill problems or are currently paying off medical debt.

 

#27 If you can believe it, one out of every seven Americans has at least 10 credit cards.

 

#28 The United States spends about 4 dollars on goods and services from China for every one dollar that China spends on goods and services from the United States.

 

#29 It is being projected that the U.S. trade deficit for 2011 will be 558.2 billion dollars.

 

#30 The retirement crisis in the United States just continues to get worse.  According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, 46 percent of all American workers have less than $10,000 saved for retirement, and 29 percent of all American workers have less than $1,000 saved for retirement.

 

#31 Today, one out of every six elderly Americans lives below the federal poverty line.

 

#32 According to a study that was just released, CEO pay at America’s biggest companies rose by 36.5% in just one recent 12 month period.

 

#33 Today, the “too big to fail” banks are larger than ever.  The total assets of the six largest U.S. banks increased by 39 percent between September 30, 2006 and September 30, 2011.

 

#34 The six heirs of Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton have a net worth that is roughly equal to the bottom 30 percent of all Americans combined.

 

#35 According to an analysis of Census Bureau data done by the Pew Research Center, the median net worth for households led by someone 65 years of age or olderis 47 times greater than the median net worth for households led by someone under the age of 35.

 

#36 If you can believe it, 37 percent of all U.S. households that

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